Cancer Risk Linked To California Tap Water In Alarming New Study

15,500 cases of cancer could be linked to toxins contained in California tap water according to a new study released by the Environmental Working Group (EWG). Researchers from the group report that arsenic, hexavalent chromium, and radioactive elements such as uranium, and radium were found in the state's drinking water.

In the report, EWG scientists say that contaminants and carcinogens were found in over 2,700 California community water systems, and they estimate that arsenic alone could be the cause of 2,751 cancer diagnosis. Nearly two-thirds of the state's drinking water systems contained at least two cancer-causing contaminants.

The group emphasizes that it's the combination of multiple contaminants that raises cancer risk. While the state and federal government set limits for individual toxins, they don't factor the toll that combined toxins may take when consumed on a regular basis. EWG also feels that the current legal limits of toxins may be based on outdated science and they note than no new contaminants have been added to the list of nationally regulated pollutants for 20 years.

In 2017 the EWG introduced a tool that accesses 30 million records from state agencies to inform consumers about the quality of water they drink.To see what chemicals have been detected in the water you drink at home, use this simple tool. Enter your zip code and the EWG Tap Water Database will provide a brief report about the findings for your water district..

An article published in October of 2017 by BestLife.com named the 25 U.S. Cities with the Worst Drinking Water - where contaminants are flowing straight from the tap. The list included 15 cities in the state of Texas and 7 cities in California, including Pamona, Corona, Bakersfield, Fresno, Irvine, and Modesto which actually topped the list.

Drinking California Tap Water Could Lead to Higher Cancer Risk, Study Says
Drinking California Tap Water Could Lead to Higher Cancer Risk, Study Says
Researchers found that contaminants in California's public water systems could contribute to about 15,500 cancer cases over the course of a lifetime.

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